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ALAMEDA CROSSFIT

BE HEALTHIER. BE HAPPIER. BE BETTER. WITH US,  ALAMEDA CROSSFIT.

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Alameda CrossFit is a revolutionary fitness training program for everyone! The program consists of constantly varied functional movements (pushing, pulling, throwing, lifting, jumping, squatting) performed at high intensity. Click here for more information!

Take a look at our Facebook page to see daily updated pictures, videos, and posts!

COME TRY A FREE CLASS!

Check out our schedule here and email Ben at Alamedaxfit@bladium.com

RAIN ANNOUCEMENT

Hey ACF’ers,

If the rain is heavy and consistent immediately before class assume that class to be cancelled. Sorry for the inconvienence. As promised, we will have a solution to this by winter!

 

 


BCF Nutrition Challenge 2014

In the 2014 BCF Nutrition Challenge 2014 there will be 2 winners: 1 male and 1 female.

How does one win?

1. Bodyfat % Decrease
2. Improvement on Provided WOD

These markers will be used to determine the winner. Don’t worry, your weight and body fat % won’t be published for the world to see. It will be for my and/or Mary’s eyes only. Your weight will be used as a tie breaker only and should not be the point of focus.

What does one win?

1. The Prestigious BCF Nutrition Challenge Winner 2014 Plaque to be displayed and marveled at by all until the end of time

What are the rules?

We are following the Whole30 (Whole21 in our case) program. I’ve provided a link to their Rules. The summarization is to eat meat, seafood, eggs, tons of vegetables, some fruit, and plenty of good fats.
Do not consume any kind of added sugar, real or artificial. Do not consume alcohol, grains, legumes, dairy, and anything you can’t pronounce.

What happens if you break the rules?

I know we all have complex, busy, pressed-for-time lives but for 21 days we are asking that you not slip. If you do, we’ll ask that you forfeit your chances of winning. We, of course, still encourage you to continue but in order to win you must make it through all 21 days. It won’t be easy, but we’re talking about the f*cking plaque that will last till the end of time here. While it isn’t dependent on you winning, we ask that you track your meals in the provided google excel spreadsheet.

Food preparation will be key to your success. Links will be provided to assist!

http://whole30.com/whole30-program-rules/
https://docs.google.com/a/bladium.com/spreadsheets/d/1F7EtZrTVZQXVEN-W_CwDA2Xtq343EU3CZW7rbidF3wQ/edit#gid=0

Final Thoughts:

We used weight loss, bodyfat %, and improvement on a WOD because they’re measurable markers of your health. The benefits of this lifestyle however, reach beyond your physical health. Your goals should include understanding the relationship between the foods you eat and how you feel. I hope much of what you realize during this challenge is how food impacts your energy levels, your mood, your sleep, and in turn your life.

Good luck.

BCF or DIE

NutritionLogo


Wednesday, October 1st 2014

WEDNESDAY
Mobility: Glute Activation
Strength: Work up to 90% of your 3RM then do 2 sets of 8 at 50% of your 3RM
Challenge: n/a
Fitness - For time:
Row 1K then immediately run 800M
Sport - For time:
Row 1K then immediately run 800M
COMP Team: Invictus

Coaches “Plan of Attack” - Oh dear, pure cardio WOD? DON’T YOU CHERRYPICK! Get in here, do the WOD, and feel better about yourself for it! I tried to generate some appeal by throwing in some deadlifts…

Click the headline to access the original source.

7 Exercises to Maximize Hand, Wrist, and Forearm Strength

Guest Contributor

It is extremely important not to neglect working your forearms during your exercise routines. The hands, wrists, and forearms should be prioritized while warming up and while working out. Below, I will review and demonstrate several stretches and essential exercises that will allow you to build strong and symmetric forearms.

 

wrist exercises, forearm exercises, levi harrison, mobility, strength

 

The Benefits of Forearm and Wrist Exercises

So often, the biceps and triceps are the focal point of upper extremity development, while the forearms and wrists are given minimal attention. But the forearms and wrists allow us to perform the exercises that develop and maximize biceps, triceps, deltoid, chest, and back strength. Therefore, it is imperative that we devote time and energy to optimize the strength of our hands, wrists, and forearms.

 

As an orthopedic surgeon, I speak with many of my athletes and patients about forearm and leg development on a regular basis. Many of them complain about having thin, bird-like legs and forearms. But if you work your legs and forearms, they will respond and develop. We have to do the work and eliminate any excuses such as “my legs are always small” or “my forearms just don’t seem to bulk up.” Do the work and get the results.

 

7 Essential Forearm and Wrist Exercises

Here are my seven essential tips to really help you to develop strong and symmetric wrists and forearms. I recommend doing these exercises three times per week. Watch the video for a visual demonstration of the exercises.

 

 

  1. Flex and extend all fingers, while making a complete fist for 30 seconds. Next, open and close your fingers do 2 sets of each for a total of a minute.
  2. Flex your wrist and hold in maximum flex for 30 seconds with the elbow straight but not locked.
  3. Extend your wrist with the elbow straight for 30 seconds. Do 2 sets for a total of 2 minutes. These initial three stretching exercises will prepare you for the more complex and more intense weight-bearing exercises to optimize muscular development and the strength of the forearm.
  4. Seated Wrist Hammer Curls - In a seated position with your back straight, place your forearm on your thighs with your thumbs pointed upward. Use a 5-, 10-, or 20lb weight in a hammer position and lift it back and forth slowly for 3 sets of 20 repetitions. This will develop your brachioradialis muscle, which inserts at the distal aspect of the forearm at the wrist. Greater hypertrophy of this muscle will give more definition and balance of the forearm.
  5. Seated Wrist Straight Curls - This is to develop your flexor muscles. In a seated position, with your forearms on your thighs and palms facing upward, with a 5-, 10-, or even 20lb weight in hand, flex your wrist upward. Keep the forearms well placed against your thighs for greater stability and isolation of the wrist and forearm musculature. Be careful to place the wrist three to four inches away from the knee to allow the full range of motion. Do 3 sets of 20 repetitions.
  6. Seated Reverse Wrist Curls - This is to develop your extensor muscles and is also done in a seated position with your forearms on your thigh, palms facing downward, with the wrist three to four inches away from the knees. Grasp the weight and extend the wrist fully. Do this for 3 sets of 20 and be sure to not lift the elbows from the thighs when extending the wrists. Keep the palms down.
  7. Finger Curls - This is an easy exercise to perform and will develop finger and hand strength. Simply sit and hold a 5-, 10-, or 15lb in weight your hand. Turn your hand with the palm upward with the back of your wrist on your thigh. Allow the weight to roll down your fingers, and now curl your fingers back holding the weight securely. Remember to keep the back of your wrist against your thigh throughout the execution of the exercise. Use weight which you can effectively control and execute the exercises properly.

 

Ultimately, these seven exercises will help to maximize the strength and contours of your hand, wrist, and forearm. This increase in the overall strength of your upper extremities will also help to improve your hand and wrist dexterity, which in turn can improve competitive performance in athletics, gaming, and even in day-to-day tasks.

 

LEVI HARRISON
Dr. Levi Harrison earned his medical degree at the University of California at Davis, School of Medicine and completed fellowship at the internationally renowned Indiana Hand Center in Indianapolis. He completed his Orthopedic Surgery residency in Los Angeles where he now resides and sees patients.   Dr. Harrison’s practice is the center of excellence for sports-related upper extremity and shoulder injuries, as well as hand rehabilitation. He has a special interest in hand and wrist… Read More

Tuesday, September 30th 2014

Mobility: Hips
Strength: Take 50-60% of your heavy single/1RM Back Squat last week and perform 20 UB Reps. (Fitness can break into two sets with minimal rest)
Challenge: n/a
Fitness: EMOTM for 15 minutes
Minute 1 – 12 Wall Balls, Minute 2 – 10 Burpee Box Step Ups, 10 Ball Chops
Sport: EMOTM for 15 minutes
Minute 1 – 15 Wall Balls, Minute 2 – 10 Burpee Box Jump Overs, 10 Ball Chops
COMP Team: Invictus

Coaches “Plan of Attack” - You read correctly. 20 rep back squat program is back! For those of you new to this cycle, it can be a bit of a shock to the system. Feel free to break it up into 2 sets of 10 if you’re getting out of position.

I know this looks like a 15 minute workout, and theoretically it is, but you’ll have rest in between the minute… maybe. We know these work outs are tough, especially tough to see them week after week. Keep at it. This is not just about building your physical work capacity, its about testing your mental limits as well.

Wishing ACF’ers, Erica Melissa, a speedy recovery! We’re all looking forward to your return, Erica!

ericasurgery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Monday and Weekly Preview

9/22/2014
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
MOBILITY: Shoulders Hips Glute Activation Wrists Hips
SKILL OR STRENGTH: Toes to Bar! Take 50-60% of your heavy single/1RM Back Squat last week and perform 20 UB Reps. (Fitness can break into two sets with minimal rest) Work up to 90% of your 3RM then do 2 sets of 8 at 50% of your 3RM Post Strict Press perform bulletproof shoudlers  TBA
CHALLENGE: 25 Unbroken n/a n/a n/a
FITNESS: Every 3:30 minutes for 4 Rd’s EMOTM for 15 minutes For time: Strict Press
Run 400 M and 6 Push Presses, 6 Push Jerks (95/65) Minute 1 – 10 Wall Balls, Minute 2 – 10 Burpee Box Step Ups, 10 Ball Chops Row 1K then immediately run 800M Work up to 90% of your 3RM then do 3 sets of 10 KB Push Presses  TBA
SPORT: Every 3:30 minutes for 4 Rd’s EMOTM for 15 minutes For time: Strict Press
Run 400 M and 6 Push Presses, 4 Push Jerks, 2 Split Jerks (165/105) Minute 1 – 10 Wall Balls, Minute 2 – 10 Burpee Box Jump Overs, 10 Ball Chops and 5 Russian Sit Ups Row 1K then immediately run 800M Work up to 90% of your 3RM then do 3 sets of 10 KB Push Presses  TBA
COMPETITORS: Invictus Invictus Invictus Invictus Invictus

Coaches “Plan of Attack”- You should have :45-:60 rest between rounds. Choose a weight that will allow you to go unbroken and/or no more than 2 sets and finish within those time constraints. If you’re a good runner and can consistently finish your 400M in less than 1:45, push the weight a bit.

ACF’ers,

As we wrap up our 21 Day Nutritional Challenge, I couldn’t help but to spend my Sunday obsessing on the successes and failures.

Before I get into it all, here is some context: 

I grew up overweight. I have a distinct memory of being in kindergarden and realizing I was bigger than almost all the kid’s around me. Since that day I was very aware of my weight and begin questioning my diet. I thought to myself, “I’ll just eat what my older twin sisters eat, they’re skinny.” Soon after we took a trip to Burger King, my sisters ordered a fried chicken sandwich, no mayonnaise and no lettuce. I followed suit, “This oughta do it! Damn mayonnaise.” After doing my best to mimic my sisters diet for some time but continuing to gain weight, I accepted that it was not working. Before even starting high school I had tried Weight Watchers, Atkins, eating less, living off of lean cuisines, among whatever other fad’s came and went. This is really just a long winded way of saying I know of the difficulties of weight loss and my belief in the paleo diet is based on a lifetime experience of paying particular attention to food and its effect on one’s body and mind.

While a few of you who completed the challenge experienced all the expected benefits, this was not the case for all you. There are various reasons why you may not have experienced the results you wanted. The reason could be as simple as unrealistic expectations (21 days is but a drop in the bucket in your life of eating) or more complicated such as chronic stress, lack of sleep, or hormonal imbalances. So what do you do from here? I would strongly caution you from giving up on the paleo lifestyle altogether. I’ve spent the morning pouring over information with the hopes of simplifying my argument for and belief in the paleo diet. I thought what may be most convincing is a comparison between foods found in a paleo diet versus one dominated by grains. The attached screen shot is from an extensive study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2002, by author Foster-Powell, whose goal was to provide reliable glycemic index values. Glycemic index and load tells us how that food effects our blood sugar and insulin levels. The load is what is particularly telling as they are identical in all the foods listed – 10 grams. For example, 10 grams of white bread has a glycemic load of 34.7 while 10 grams of a sweet potato has a glycemic load of 13.1.

Can you live off of grains? Yes. Should they be part of your diet? No. As shown in the chart, they are never the better choice. They don’t offer the same nutritional value and their glycemic index and load far exceed their counterparts. Why should we care about the glycemic index and load of food?

Because it effects our blood sugar level which is responsible for determining whether we burn or store fat.

Damn this is already so long there is so much more to talk about! Weight loss, if that is your goal, is just the beginning of the benefits that are experienced when following a paleo diet. Improved mood, energy levels, sleep, and mental clarity among so much else is on the other side, you just have to want it. Can you still have a beer on Beer Friday and experience all of this? Of course.

Though this post may make me sound like a Paleo Nazi, I’m not. About 80-85% of what I eat is paleo. There is room for error, especially when the foundation is strong. I hope this nutritional challenge can if nothing else be catalyst for your learning and understanding of your diet. We’ll announce the winners sometimes next week!

ACF or DIE

 glycemic idex grains vs paleo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Saturday, September 27th 2014. BEACH WOD!

ACF BEACH DAY!

Location: Directly across from the McDonalds at South Shore. We recommend parking at south shore but are not responsible if you get a ticket (you won’t).

Time: 10:00 am

Partner WOD:

Digging, KB’s, Running, and Burpees!

Beer: CHECK!

ACF or DIE

Photo: ACF BEACH DAY TOMORROW!</p><p>Location: Directly across from the McDonalds at South Shore. We recommend parking at south shore but are not responsible if you get a ticket (you won't). </p><p>Time: 10:00 am</p><p>Partner WOD:</p><p>Digging, KB's, Running, and Burpees!</p><p>Beer: CHECK!</p><p>ACF or DIE

 


Friday, September 26th 2014

FRIDAY
Mobility: Hips
Skill: Partner Relay – 4 minute AMRAP farmers carry of plates. Must hold by fingers. 50M relays.
Challenge: n/a
Fitness: “Frenemy”
Frenemy 1 – runs 200M, Frenemy 2 – Hang Power Clean + Front Squat AMRAP (115/75) until partner returns. Switch. 4 Rd’s total.
Sport: “Frenemy”
Frenemy 1 – runs 200M, Frenemy 2 – Squat Clean (155/105) AMRAP until partner returns. Switch. 4 Rd’s total.
COMP Team: Invictus

Coaches “Plan of Attack” - These Frenemy workouts are tricky because you want to do the run as quickly as possible to give your frenemy as little time as possible but you also want to have enough energy to knock out as many reps of the movement as you can. You need to think about what you’re stronger in, the movement or the run. Take advantage of your strengths in this workout. As always, stay in good positions during the clean + squat and you’ll feel better for the run!

NOTE!: You can do “Jackie” instead anytime from Friday to Monday to complete your 21 Day BCF Nutritional Challenge.

Click the link to access the original source!

Building an Injury-Free Body with Mobility Expert

Kelly Starrett

 

Kelly Starrett, Doctor of Physical Therapy and co-owner of San Francisco CrossFit, is fond of saying humans beings should be able to perform maintenance on themselves. In Starrett’s mind, the days of seeking physical therapy to merely resolve pain and are over. He believes that if we can understand how to get ourselves into proper positions for any activity — whether it’s our elbows in a push-up, foot placement for a squat, or shoulder position when we’re texting — we can minimize injury and maximize performance. This would translate to running faster, achieving downward dog more fully, or even more efficient flip turns in the pool.

A former whitewater slalom paddler for the US Canoe and Kayak Teams, Starrett led the Men’s Whitewater Rafting Team to two national titles and competition in two World Championships. He’s now a sought-after speaker and educator, traveling all over the world and lecturing audiences from college strength and conditioning coaches to members of the military. At home in San Francisco, clients of his orthopedic sports medicine practice have included world champion rowers, Tour de France cyclists, Olympic weightlifters, and ballet dancers.

Starrett’s methodologies evolved alongside his involvement in CrossFit, which he discovered in 2004 when it was still an obscure strength and conditioning program. He became an early adopter, earning a certification to coach and opening one of the first CrossFit gyms in the country. Even though he’s been producing instructional content for the CrossFit community since 2008, Starrett is best known forMobilityWOD.com, a website he started in 2010 with one video demonstrating how to deepen one’s squat. MobilityWOD now contains three years worth of daily video posts on everything from knee painand shoulder extension to breathing mechanics and post injury rehab.

We caught up with the mastermind behind MobilityWOD to talk about his new book (Becoming a Supple Leopard), injury prevention, and why ballet dancers should deadlift.

How did you first get interested in physical therapy?

I was at a ski race camp [in Austria] with the reigning world champion, diagramming the arc of the turn, and I remember being like, “I love this, I understand this, this is it: Making the complex simple. Show me the constituent parts and I can do it. Let me understand the process.” I’ve always been obsessed that way. Always.

I quit the [kayaking] national team and moved to San Francisco, where I realized that I needed to go to grad school. This is crazy, but I literally had a moment of satori. I was out surfing and… I heard God’s voice, I saw the spheres, I was like, “Oh, I guess I have to go to grad school.”

 

How did you discover CrossFit? 

I was Olympic lifting once a week with a guy in [South San Francisco] in [the basement [of an old gym]. The first semester of physio school, I was looking for information on how to Olympic lift with dumbbells and I was searching the web. I saw this website, CrossFit. This was early, early CrossFit. And I think there were four or five CrossFit [gyms] in the world. I saw this website and was like, “Whoa, this is interesting.” I read the little manifesto and tried a workout.

I’m a good athlete, I’m a fucking good athlete. And I got crushed. It was “Cindy*” I was devastated. The work secret is out of the bag now. CrossFit has already fundamentally changed the fact that people’s intensity is higher. Now there’s P90X, “Insanity.” People are working harder. This was the dark ages, no one was doing it.

*Note: Cindy is a popular CrossFit benchmar workout consisting of pull-ups, push-ups, and squats.

What made you want to combine physical therapy and CrossFit?

As a Physio, it was perfect because I was getting all this classic medical Western thought diagnosis stuff and I was forced to deal with the dissonance of, “This is how I have to learn how to move. I have to be a better Olympic lifter. I have to learn the tenets of power lifting. I have to be more fit. I have to be a skilled runner.” And at the same time I [had to] reconcile that with what I’m understanding and learning about with rehab. And they were clearly disconnected.

I don’t want to say I am the first person to do this, but I had never seen anyone mobilize someone’s hip to improve something that wasn’t painful. People weren’t doing mobilizations for position. They were stretching, but they weren’t understanding why we were stretching.

I started tinkering with mobilizing a guy’s hips because he was an MMA fighter and he could get into guard better and I wondering if that would work for squatting, too. The physical therapy texts are not about performance or rehab or diagnosis or even injury prevention. It’s about the techniques we use when someone is injured.

The whole medical system is predicated on, “Oh, your issue is resolved and you’re functional.” And it should be, “Oh, you’re out of pain, functional, now go solve the rest of it on your own.”

How did MobilityWOD.com come about?

I started teaching some friends. Some little gyms were like, “Can you do a shoulder thing?” And I would talk about shoulders, I would talk about knees. I did this one day course down in Santa Cruz, it was called “A Day with Kelly Starrett: Chasing Performance.” And all of a sudden I have this kind of image. “Why am I seeing the same things in my physical therapy practice? Why is it that no one knows this?” Then I was like, “Well, I can change that! Here’s what we do: I have this iPhone, I have Blogger, I am going to put up a video a day for a year.”

Soon it started to gain momentum and people found out about it. And I realized people needed templates, they need recipes, they needed examples. I needed to make a case.

Can you talk about mobility to stretch and stay loose versus mobility to optimize performance?

Do you have what we know as the full range of motion for the human being? That’s decided. We know how much elbow flexion there is. That’s not debatable.

What’s interesting is how we can divest ourselves of the fact. It’s like, “Hey, it’s okay that I don’t have the range of motion to do this sport, it doesn’t matter because I can still do the sport. It’s okay if I’m at 50 percent of my capacity as a human — that’s okay because I’m still a human.”

And I think that’s the problem, that we’ve sort of made this case where we’ll be like “Well, I can roll out a little bit, stretch, bend over, pull my hamstrings a little bit, I’m not so stiff. Great, goodbye!” I don’t think people are going after the corners. We’re leaving this 20 percent margin of function. So, we were confusing the fact that we didn’t have pain… with the fact that we were working at peak efficiency.

I only know a handful of people that are working at 90 percent of their efficiency. We’re so robust that you can buffer bad diet for decades and it doesn’t matter. You can move like crap for decades and it doesn’t matter. What does that tell you about the resiliency of the human being?

Are some people naturally more or less flexible?

Watch kids crawl — look at all the hip flexion. It’s all the same. You have infinite potential as a child. It’s very level. That’s why you don’t see any difference between boys and girls in middle school, dude.

Kids in the playground just tear off at recess, right? Do they have to activate their glutes? No, they have all that potential. They can put their arms over their head. You know they have full ankle range of motion.

When do we lose this innate mobility?

Not teaching movement practices. Why aren’t those kids in gymnastics? Why are [kids who take gymnastics] little cheetahs the rest of their lives? Remember those kids? They learned to backflip and they can always do a backflip? And they can jump off the trampoline and they can do all that crazy shit? I think that’s why—talk to any coach, they’re like “Oh, yeah, your kid has to be in gymnastics. Period.”

You say people should be able to perform basic maintenance on themselves. Is there one thing that people ought to do?

Protect your nervous system. That’s it. What is it about your spinal positioning that’s wretched? I’m less worried about how stiff your calves are because the number of calf injuries and the number of Achilles injuries [are] low compared to the number of back tweaks and hip tweaks. If you have one thing to do during the day, what is it that you can protect about your nervous system? Your nervous system is your limiting factor. Period.

What is the one movement for that?

I’d say the single most significant thing is to… get people to stop sitting. The “smoking” of our generation is sitting. A treadmill is not the answer. The answer is not to sit. So, you need a cheap-ass barstool and a higher desk and you can lean and put your foot up and change position and just by removing that stimulus alone, life would change.

Is there such a thing as sport-specific training?

My ballet dancers don’t want to deadlift heavy. They have to deadlift, but, like how do I improve their [dancing], right? My male dancers need to be better overhead so they’re not broken when they’re holding their partner. So, the real thing I think is interesting is [that so much of] this is transferable to anything that’s important to you.

You know, I have an idea about what it means to be the best human functionally but people don’t want to work so hard. Have a deeper understanding of what it is you do. Like, if you love to go, you know, fight and you like boxing — box more efficiently, I think that’s where the scalability is; the revolution of it.

How can an athlete know if their programming is safe?

Because you get better at your sport. And you’re working at the limits of your positional understanding. If you have full range of motion or are working towards it, then chances are you’re going to be very protected. It’s built in. Because you’re not going to dive into the pool and dislocate your shoulder because for the last month we’ve been pressing, we’ve gone overhead a gazillion times.

Thanks for your time, Kelly, and looking forward to seeing your future project.


Thursday, September 25th 2014

THURSDAY
Mobility: Wrists
Skill: Double Under progression and practice. 2 minute challenge
Challenge: 200 DU’s
Fitness: Strict Press
Find a heavy set of 3. Superset w/ bar hang
Sport: Strict Press
Find a 3RM. Superset w/ bar hang
Competition: Invictus

No WOD? Correct. Shoulder strength and health seems to be an issue for a lot of ACF’ers. We want to take a stab doing some shoulder strengthening exercises not for time. If you hate it, let us know, haha but we’re doing this because we think it’s the best thing for you guys.

ACF’ers, (not a typo, haha)

Couple happenings!

1. Advanced CrossFit class will take place at Crown Beach this Saturday at 10:00am. I’ll bring the beer.

2. Beginning Weightlifting just finished up their 8 week Clean and Jerk cycle. Tomorrow we are starting our 8 week snatch cycle. If you’re interested in coming, we’re accepting 4 more participants. I ask, however, that you commit to coming to at least 6/8 of the weeks as we’re limiting the number of participants.

Here is Jon below with a 15 pound PR in the last week of the cycle.

ACF or DIE

http://www.coachseye.com/v/Z8c2

Today, ACF’ers, is Stan Yee’s bday. You know who he is. All ACF’ers do. Stan walks around like he owns the place, because he pretty much does. Not literally, but he was one of the first ever ACF’ers, meaning he was here when it was AXF, then BCF, and now ACF. Through out it all he has been the life of our community. As another ACF’er said to me the other day, “BCF doesn’t exist without a guy like Stan. You need him.” It was absolutely true. We can’t thank you enough for all you do for the community, Stan. Looking forward to the years to come! HBD! – Your BCF Fam

0413stansmile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Wednesday, September 24th 2014

WEDNESDAY
Mobility: Glute Activation
Strength: Every :90 for 5 sets do 5 Speed Deadlifts (explosive finish drop at the top and drop). Superset with 10 Hollow Rocks. Stay light , 65-70%, working on speed in the finish.
Challenge: n/a
Fitness: 9-15-21-15-9
Med Ball Walking Lunges, RKBS, Double Under Attempts (if DU’s are a long shot and you couldnt use the practice, do 30 single unders each round)
Sport: 9-15-21-15-9
Med Ball Walking Lunges, 1 arm alternating RKBS (53/35), Box Jump Overs
COMP Team: Invictus

Coaches “Plan of Attack” - Given that these are walking lunges, not to be done in place, I want you positioned with your back to the handstand wall fence, then walking towards the shed and then once out of room, perform at 180 and continue. Repeat until reps are complete.

Sullivan always coming through with the great shots.

COMP Team doing our best to lead by example with our slogan, BE BETTER!

ACF017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tuesday, September 23rd 2014

TUESDAY
Mobility: Hips
Strength: Fitness – Take 20 minutes to find a heavy-ish back squat, do not 1RM. Sport – Take 20 minute to build to a 1RM Back Squat
Challenge: n/a
Fitness - Against a 5 minute clock for 4 Rd’s:
10 Goblet Squats, 10 Burpee Box Step Overs, 500M row or 400M run (2 of each ideally)
Sport - Against a 5 minute clock for 4 Rd’s:
5 Bear Complexes (115/75), 30 Double Unders, 500M row or run (2 of each ideally)
COMP Team: Invictus

Coaches “Plan of Attack” - Similar to last weeks workout but the row/run is at the end not the beginning. Again we would like you to have :90-:60 rest between round here. We want to see sprinting on the run or the row. Think efficiency and control during the movements, then let it ride for the conditioning!

For those of you that didn’t see the post on our Facebook members page, we are transition our name Bladium CrossFit back to our licensed affiliate name Alameda CrossFit. This is at the request of CrossFit Headquarters. While a bit frustrated we are actually welcoming the change and think it’ll be good for us in the long run! If you aren’t on our members page, please join! A lot of our communication with you is through there. https://www.facebook.com/groups/330618113668443/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Monday and Weekly Preview

9/22/2014
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
MOBILITY: Shoulders Hips Glute Activation Wrists Hips
SKILL OR STRENGTH: Kipping Pull Up. If you have the kipping pull up, work buttefly or kipping chest to bar. 5 sets of 5. If you don’t have pull ups, work the kip and pull up/ring row negatives. 5 sets of 3. Fitness – Take 20 minutes to find a heavy-ish back squat, do not 1RM. Sport – Take 20 minute to build to a 1RM Back Squat EMOTM 5 Speed Deadlifts (explosive finish drop at the top and drop) for 5 sets. Superset with 10 Hollow Rocks. Stay light , 65-70%, working on speed in the finish. Double Under progression and practice. 2 minute challenge Partner Relay – 4 minute AMRAP farmers carry of plates. Must hold by fingers. 50M relays.
CHALLENGE: n/a n/a n/a 200 DU’s n/a
FITNESS: 3 Rd’s: Against a 5 minute clock for 4 Rd’s: 9-15-21-15-9 Strict Press “Frenemy”
Minute 1 – Kipping Knee Tuck AMRAP, Minute 2 – Strict Push Up AMRAP (use box to scale), Minute 3 – Ball Slams 10 Goblet Squats, 10 Burpee Box Step Overs, 500M row or 400M run (2 of each ideally) Med Ball Walking Lunges, RKBS, Double Under Attempts (if DU’s are a long shot and you couldnt use the practice, do 30 single under each round) Find a heavy set of 3. Superset: 30-60 second bar hang Frenemy 1 – runs 200M, Frenemy 2 – Hang Power Clean + Front Squat AMRAP (115/75) until partner returns. Switch. 4 Rd’s total.
SPORT: 3 Rd’s: Against a 5 minute clock for 4 Rd’s: 9-15-21-15-9 Strict Press “Frenemy”
Minute 1 – Toes to Bar AMRAP, Minute 2 Ring Dip AMRAP, Minute 3 Ball Slams 5 Bear Complexes (115/75), 30 Double Unders, 500M row or run (2 of each ideally) Med Ball Walking Lunges, 1 arm alternating RKBS, Box Jump Overs Find a 3RM. Superset with 30-60 second bar hang Frenemy 1 – runs 200M, Frenemy 2 – Squat Clean (155/105) AMRAP until partner returns. Switch. 4 Rd’s total.
COMPETITORS: Invictus Invictus Invictus Invictus Invictus

Coaches “Plan of Attack” - In the first 2 movements there is the potential to redline (pushing it so hard that you go from being able to do 20 toes to bar to only 5 or 6 in the minute).Pushing your limits is a fine line but training is the place to do it. If you mess up and redline at least you’ll have a better understanding of your limitations.

This picture ain’t gonna get old for a while!

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Saturday, September 20th 2014

EVENT # 6 From CrossFit Team Series 2014

As male/female pairs perform as many rounds as possible in 15 minutes of:

Rx’d Division

50 deadlifts, partner holds deadlift, 225 / 155 lb.

50 handstand push-ups, partner holds handstand

Masters Division

35 deadlifts, partner holds deadlift, 225 / 155 lb.

35 handstand push-ups, partner holds handstand

Scaled Division

50 deadlifts, partner holds deadlift, 155 / 105 lb.

50 push presses, partner holds handstand, 105 / 65 lb.

Notes

One pair will work at a time and switch after each completed round. This event begins with both barbells on the floor and both athletes standing tall. While performing deadlifts, the partner must be holding their barbell at the top of the deadlift. During the handstand push-up, the partner must be holding a handstand on the wall. Pairs may divide the reps in whatever manner they choose.

All of the deadlift repetitions must be performed before the pair may move on to the handstand push-ups. Once the first pair finishes their last handstand push-up, they must tag their teammates before the second pair can begin their deadlifts. The teams score is the total repetitions completed within the 15-minute time cap.

Movement Standards

Deadlift

This is a traditional deadlift with the hands outside the knees. Sumo deadlifts are not permitted. Starting at the floor, the barbell is lifted until hips and knees reach full extension with the shoulders behind the bar. Any hand position is allowed, but the arms must be straight throughout. No bouncing. The non-working partner must have their barbell held at the waist for the entire rep. If the deadlift rep starts prior to the partner being at lockout, it is a no rep. If the partner lowers their barbell prior to the athlete finishing their deadlift, it is a no rep.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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